21.12.12

STITCHED-BACK FOOT AIRMAN : Seven Egg Timing Greats E.P. (Very Mouth, 1986)

Stitched 1
Stitched 2
Proving that there's nothing like a eye-catching name to commandeer people's attention, I heard of (& read about) Stitched-Back Foot Airman several years before I found any of their records. Despite their polarising monicker (best or worst ever, you decide), there's perilously close to nowt about them anywhere online - their disarmingly uninformative Myspace page aside. All I've been able to surmise is that they were formed in Southampton in the early 1980s by Simon Vincent, & his younger brother Robin, with Mike Farmer & artist/film maker Crimp Beringer. I suspect they may have had connections with another Southampton outfit, kit-synth debasers Games To Avoid, but that could just as easily be bewildered wishful thinking on my part? Following a move to London, Stitched-Back Foot Airman began releasing records on their own Very Mouth label, including the skewed 9-song mini-album debut I'm posting here, & the almost-as-marvellous Wouldn't You Like To Know 7". Somewhat tenuously, the sleeve of Seven Egg Timing Greats has always reminded me of The Residents' debut - "Ringo Starfish", et al.

Presently, they signed to Marc Riley's In Tape label for a couple of 45s, before sauntering off into post-C86 abeyance, leaving only a handful of very odd self-made videos in their wake. Prime contenders for the "Where are they now (& who were they anyway)?" dossier.

Apologies for the uncharacteristic paucity of anything tangible - as always, any further info would be more than welcome.

● Eat Nine

n.b. New link (by request) - if the band or current copyright holder have any issues regarding my sharing this record please leave a message below & I'm delete it immediately (ta).

9 comments:

  1. A truly great band, after releasing the Shake Up and Costa Del Sol EPs, and Business Politician, they shortened their name to Stitch to release the Manic & Global LP (which is the one record that seems to be still officially available for download).

    A couple of years ago Simon Vincent released a solo album on CD Baby - http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/simonv. It's good but more laid back and missing the really way out stuff from the old band.

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  2. I don't think their records were particularly easy to get hold of, even back in the late '80s... I'm surprised they haven't been re-discovered & re-promoted as a "great lost indie band" yet, there's still time I suppose?

    I've not heard those later records, are they worth tracking down?

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  3. ikeaddy7.11.13

    I saw SBFA at the Crypt, Depford, 1985. one of the most memorable gigs I've been to. Amazing music and a groovy vicar.

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  4. Sadly I never had the pleasure...

    "Groovy vicar"? Do tell!

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  5. Anonymous14.11.13

    Long shot -- but can you please re-up this one? Thanks!

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  6. Sorry, I didn't realise this link was down - hang on, I'll update it this evening... ;)

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  7. Anonymous30.11.13

    Have their seven egg timing classics ep here in NZ. Purchased mid 80s from Notting Hill record & tape exchange for 2.50 probably heard them on John Peel first or just liked the cover...

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  8. Hi, I was a close friend and very involved with Stitched-back Foot Airman and the Very Mouth label (the "Maydew House" address that appears on some releases was my flat). You're right to assume they developed initially as a side project to Simon Vincent's other band Games To Avoid and Rob and Mike's band Greeting No4. Always adventurous and varied in sound with all three members writing songs and lot's of instrument swopping they now seem to me to have been "ahead of their time" and consistently under-appreciated in their day. A truly great band (and lovely people to boot). .

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  9. I agree, somewhat "ahead of their time" and unjustly forgotten. Listening back to their records now - and particularly this one - they don't evoke the era they were recorded/released in at all ( a good thing obvs), unlike most of their contemporaries' - I don't think they were even granted a then-customary Peel session were they? - it's a a great shame that they've been ignored and forgotten. But there's still just about time for a last-minute tasty retrospective I reckon... perhaps Cherry Red could step in and save the day? :)

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